Marine Corps veteran, former CIA Medical Officer creates low-cost lightweight Automated External Defibrillator (AED) to save lives

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COLORADO– A Marine Corps veteran and former CIA Medical Officer has created a mini, low-cost, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) to help empower anyone, anywhere to save a life.

Gary Montague is the founder and CEO of Denver-based HeartHero and the creator of “Elliot”.

Elliot can be used on both adults and children younger than 8 years old or who weigh less than 55 pounds.

It was during a CIA operation, that Montague experienced the need for a highly portable and robust AED firsthand.

“I really wanted it for my backpack when I was in the military and CIA operations, but as I did more research I realized that the 70% were affected in the homes for cardiac arrest. We need to move the AED there – no longer should it sit on a wall in a government building,” said Montague.

“It needs to be by your side – in your purse – in your backpack – next to your loved one that you care about the most,” said Montague.

The company, HeartHero, says when an AED shock is delivered within three minutes of a cardiac arrest, the chance of survival is higher than 70%. However, in the time that it takes for emergency medical services to arrive with an AED, it’s often too late.

The Elliot weights only 1.3 lbs and it’s high tech.

The device will not shock a person if it isn’t needed, making HeartHero safe to use if you are not sure whether a person is experiencing sudden cardiac arrest.

Courtesy: HeartHero

Elliot is fully functional on it’s own but also has an app that can be paired to bring the AED to life.

When in use, Elliot can also auto notify emergency services, a feature designed to shorten response times and to further strengthen the chance of survival.

Elliot is multilingual and will deliver step-by-step voice instructions with clear visual prompts to guide users calmly and confidently through crisis.

The voice of Elliot is a 5x sudden cardiac arrest survivor, Carrie Romero.

Carrie Romero: Courtesy HeartHero

In the testing process, Montague says children as young as six years old can safely operate the device.

HeartHero has received its CE Mark, officially readying it for deployment in the fight against sudden cadiac death.

“I don’t want us to be bystanders, I want us to be TRY-standers – I want us to act and do something. If your loved one is on the ground in front of you – it might be one of the scariest moments of your life. With this device you have a chance to have another birthday, another anniversary… for them to watch their grandkids grow up – this is the impact I want to make,” said Montague.

>>To follow HeartHero and stay up to date on this product’s release, visit their website here.

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