Colorado taking down two coronavirus alternative care sites created in April

Coronavirus
FILE - This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. (NIAID-RML via AP)

FILE – This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases – Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. (NIAID-RML via AP)

DENVER — The state of Colorado is taking down two temporary alternate care sites that were created near the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

The alternative care sites at the Ranch Complex in Loveland and Western Memory Care Center in Grand Junction will be deconstructed by mid-November, according to the state.

In April, Gov. Jared Polis announced alternative care sites would be used to provide medical care for coronavirus patients who had stabilized and no longer required critical hospital care.

At that time, Colorado’s seven-day average positivity rate was 19.66%. Now, it’s down to 3.41%.

“In the early days of the pandemic, Colorado saw rapid infection growth and modeling data indicated that we were on pace to far exceed the capacity of our healthcare system,” the state said in a statement Tuesday. “It was critical to build capacity outside of our hospitals to ensure that Coloradans would be able to have the care that they needed if we exceeded institutional capacity.”

“The need to use the alternative care facilities was mitigated by the Stay at Home order and Coloradans’ commitment to helping slow the spread of COVID-19,” according to the state. “Throughout this time we partnered with our hospitals and healthcare system to increase hospital capacity and ventilators. Colorado doctors have also become more experienced in treating COVID-19 patients in ways that result in better outcomes, shorter lengths of stay and less demand for ventilators.”

The state said they will transfer equipment from the two deconstructed sites to the three remaining sites: the Colorado Convention Center, St. Mary Corwin, and St. Anthony 84th Avenue.

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