Colorado Springs fossils shed light on evolutionary process

Digital Now

DENVER — Fossils found in Colorado Springs are shedding light on how life on Earth recovered after a massive asteroid wiped out dinosaurs 66-million years ago.

Thursday, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science unveiled the fossils found in Corral Bluffs in 2016.

Collection of mammal fossils found in Corral Bluffs, Denver Museum of Nature & Science.
Collection of plant fossils found in Corral Bluffs, Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

Scientists say the plant and mammal fossils they found are giving them a timeline of the Earth’s environment from the first one-million years after the dinosaurs’ extinction, to the modern world.

According to Dr. Miller, they were drawn to Colorado Springs because of the exposed rocks.

Dr. Tyler Lyson, curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, explains why these rocks were easily looked over in the past:

The discovery of these fossils has led to findings of new species of turtles, mammals, and crocodiles.

Denver Museum of Nature & Science.
Denver Museum of Nature & Science.
Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

According to Dr. Lyson, nearly a thousand vertebrate fossils and more than 6,000 plant fossils were collected.

Dr. Miller and Lyson in Coral Bluffs, Denver Museum of Nature & Science.
Coral Bluffs, Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending Stories